Notes from Bea: Sorry for the length of this post – originally, it was intended to highlight what I thought was a simple musical theft, but then through research I discovered it was a theft-of-a-theft-of-a-theft. Theft-ception if you will. Enjoy!

For those of you who may not know, as new music comes out, or as I’m inspired to write about new music, I like to post a song on Tuesday as my latest “toy” to share with all of you.

This week is unusual because I tend to write about songs that I like – however, this week I was infuriated by a female Kpop group’s rendition of Whatta Man by Salt-N-Pepa.

Let’s be real, no one should ever cover Salt-N-Pepa (just like many other classics that should not be messed with), and this one is just especially bad in my opinion.

Everyone should know the original, but just in case you don’t, or if you need a little ’90s in your life – here is the original Salt-N-Pepa song featuring En Vogue from 1994:

Appearing in an era when rap was mostly dominated by men, Salt-N-Pepa became the first ever all-female rap group. With so many hits like Push it, Shoop, Let’s Talk About Sex and many more, these ladies are undoubtedly a force to be reckoned with.

That being said, I.O.I is a new Korean girl group that has 11 members (yes, 11), that was recently created through a reality TV show.

Sure, let’s let these 11, basically 12-year old girls remake a Salt-N-Pepa song about adult relationships with men – sounds perfect.

Here is their version of Whatta Man:

What I don’t like here, is that I think┬áthe girls are just too young to pull off the maturity of the song, so it’s a fail for me. You simply can’t believe that they have any attachment to what they’re singing, so it lacks that genuineness that makes really good music what it is.

So this is where the shit gets real. I did a little more research, and I can’t even be mad that I.O.I released an unimpressive cover of Whatta Man, because it turns out that Salt-N-Pepa/En Vogue actually sampled Linda Lyndell’s 1968 song What a Man. gollum

To be honest, that chorus is the most memorable part of the ENTIRE song, so at this point, we can’t even call it a cover, it turns out both groups just sampled their way into success.

I know that sampling/stealing songs is common in popular music, so this is nothing new or profound, I’m just annoyed by the lack of originality that has continued now through multiple generations with this song alone.

leslieknope

Basically, it turns out that nothing is sacred and that most popular musicians are dirty thieves…

Anyway, below you can find the ACTUAL original song (or what I think is the original, maybe Linda stole it too and nothing is real):